August 30, 2012
Congeries

con·ge·ries (kon-juh-rees | kɒndʒəriz )
Latin

noun 
a collection, a mass of heterogeneous parts, an assemblage, aggregation or heap

Each one is a miniature world unto itself, a tiny functioning mechanism,a congeries of minute and mysterious moving parts.

(Source: dictionary.reference.com)

January 15, 2012
cockatrice

cock·a·trice (kok-uh-tris | kɒkətrɪs)
Middle English, from Middle French, from Medieval Latin 

noun
a legendary monster with a deadly glance, supposedly hatched by a serpent from the egg of a cock, and commonly represented with the head, legs, and wings of a cock and the body and tail of a serpent

He gave me a poisonous stare comparable to that of a cockatrice. 

Submitted by deadstillcurious

October 12, 2011
cantabile

cantabile
[kahn-tah-bi-ley, -bee-, kuhn-; It. kahn-tah-bee-le]  /kɑnˈtɑbɪˌleɪ, -bi-, kən-; It. kɑnˈtɑbiˌlɛ/
Italian [from Latin]

adjective:
songlike and flowing in style.

Children can turn the most mundane sentences into rather cantabile phrases.

OR

From gentle, catabile streams to harsh staccato passages, his compositions test the pianist’s skill, and often, the listener’s patience.

October 4, 2011
covet

covet (cuh-vet | kʌvɛt )
Middle English

verb 
to desire inordinately (sometimes to desire wrongly), to wish for eagerly

Every time I eat the perfect pastry, I can’t help but covet the recipe. 

September 4, 2011
corpuscle

cor·pus·cle (kawr-puh-suhl, -puhs-uhl | ˈkɔrpəsəl, -pʌsəl)
Latin

noun
1) Biology. an unattached cell, especially of a kind that floats freely, as a blood or lymph cell
2) Anatomy. a small mass or body forming a more or less distinct part, as the sensory receptors at nerve terminals
3) Physical Chemistry. a minute or elementary particle of matter, as an electron, proton, or atom.
4) any minute particle

We are merely corpuscles floating through the vastness of the universe.  

(Source: dictionary.reference.com)

September 3, 2011
cachinnate

cachinnate (kak-uh-neyt | ˈkækəˌneɪt)
Latin 

verb (used without object)
to laugh loudly or immoderately

The entire audience cachinnated and the comedian’s wildly vulgar jokes. 

(Source: dictionary.reference.com)

August 26, 2011
cacophony

ca·coph·o·ny (kuh-kof-uh-nee | kəˈkɒfəni)
Greek 

noun
a harsh, discordance of sounds

Improperly composed, music can become a Cacophony of musical instruments.

Submitted by earl-din.

(Source: dictionary.reference.com)

August 23, 2011
clandestine

clan·des·tine (klan-des-tin | klænˈdɛstɪn)
Latin

adjective
characterized by, done in, or executed with secrecy or concealment, especially for purposes of subversion or deception; private or surreptitious

"And though you protest,
Your disinterest,
I know clandestinely,
You’re gonna grin and bear it,
Your new found popularity!”

-"Popular," from Wicked

(I know the example isn’t really using the word in its adjective form, but the example is too good to pass up. Sorry, logophiles.)

(Source: )

August 23, 2011
callipygian

cal·li·pyg·i·an (kal-uh-pij-ee-uhn | ˌkæləˈpɪdʒiən)
Greek

adjective
having well-shaped buttocks

 I personally enjoy Adam Levine’s callipygian features.

(Source: dictionary.reference.com)

August 17, 2011
chagrin

cha·grin (shuh-grin | ʃəˈgrɪn)
French

noun
a feeling of vexation, marked by disappointment or humiliation

verb
to vex by disappointment or humiliation  

The rejection of his proposal chagrined him deeply. 

(Source: dictionary.reference.com)